July 4 and 5 Earthquakes Centered in Kern County

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Courtesy: Fox News – USGS

Were Felt as Far Away as Pacific Palisades

A 6.4 magnitude earthquake centered in the Mojave Desert occurred at 10:39 a.m. on July 4. According to the L.A. Fire Department, all 106 stations went into earthquake mode, conducting surveys of districts to determine if there were any damages.

The earthquake was felt by people living in Pacific Palisades. It occurred shortly after the completion of the Will Rogers Run and this reporter was at Estate Coffee on Via de la Paz, where customers were talking about feeling the movement and seeing signs move.

This was the strongest earthquake in Southern California since the 7.1 Hector Mine quake in the Mojave Desert in 1999.

According to ABC News, “There is about a 1 in 20 chance that this location will be having an even bigger earthquake within the next few days,” seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones said.

A 5.4 earthquake aftershock was felt on July 5 at 4:07 a.m., centered west of Searles Valley, about 125 miles northeast of Los Angeles. According to the LAFD, there were no reports of damage.

On July 5, at 8:19 p.m., Jones prediction came true with a 6.9 earthquake centered 11 miles north, northeast of Ridgecrest.

A L.A. Times article (“6.4 Earthquake Ends a Period of Seismic Calm for Southland”) noted that the faults that moved on July 4 were about 100 miles northeast of the San Andreas fault, according to seismologist Egill Hauksson.

(Editor’s note: to see quakes as they are reported, visit: http://scedc.caltech.edu/recent/Quakes/ci38457511.html)

Earthquake Supplies: The L.A. City Emergency Management Department recommends the following items for an emergency kit. Take time over this Fourth of July weekend to assemble an earthquake kit:

  • Water: 1 gallon per person or pet per day (plan for 3-7 days)
  • Food: three to seven day supply of non-perishable foods like granola bars, crackers, peanut butter and canned food (a manual can opener), pet food and baby formula
  • Battery-operated or hand-crank radio
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Duct tape and plastic sheeting
  • Hygiene supplies, toilet paper, wet wipes, garbage bags
  • Tools: Shut-off wrench for gas lines, hammer, pliers, shovel, axe, hard hat, working gloves
  • Local maps
  • Blankets and sleeping bags
  • Extra diapers, clothes and good shoes
  • Medications and spare or old eyeglasses

 Family Communication Plan: Mobile phones, computers and electricity could be disrupted during a disaster. Organize a plan for how you can reach all members of your household – including children, caregivers and the elderly. For tips, visit fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/10887.

Receive emergency alerts on NotifyLA: NotifyLA is the City of Los Angeles emergency notification system. It’s free. Text READY to 888-777 or go to http://www.emergency.lacity.org/notifyla.

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