Celebrate National Poppy Day May 27

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This year, National Poppy Day is May 27. On that day, Americans are asked to remember the sacrifices made by veterans, while they were protecting our freedoms, by wearing a red poppy. The Post 283 Auxiliary shared poppies at the town’s 100th Birthday Celebration on May 7.

The red crepe paper poppies became the national emblem of remembrance of World War I in the 1920s thanks to Canadian physician Lt. Col. McCrae poem, “In Flanders Fields.” He noticed the poppies growing the devastated landscapes and war fields, like tiny beacons of hope.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place, and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

The idea for the paper poppies is traced back to University of Georgia professor Moina Michael, who after WWI, came up with the idea of making and selling red silk poppies to raise money to support returning veterans.

Annually U.S. Auxiliaries promote the poppies in May. They are generally worn in the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand in November.

Since 2014, Ukrainians have worn the poppy as a symbol of Victory over Nazism and to commemorate victims of World War II.

If you have the opportunity, wear a poppy and honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to Celebrate National Poppy Day May 27

  1. Mary Petersen says:

    I would love to wear a poppy on May 27. Where can I get one?
    Mary

  2. Sue says:

    Mary,

    I’m checking with the Legion Post to see if there are any left–

    Sue

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